Civil War Sites in Ohio

The Ohio River served as the dividing line between the North and South in middle America, with Ohio offering freedom and opportunity to refugee enslaved individuals. Ohio also served as an important political calculation for President Abraham Lincoln, who understood the importance of Ohio (and neighboring Indiana) as the South closed off economic traffic downriver. … Read more

Travel Guide: Civil War Harpers Ferry

Snuggled between the steep crags of the Blue Ridge, at the point where the Shenandoah River meets the Potomac, Harpers Ferry is a quiet mountain village of stone-and-brick buildings and narrow, hilly streets. Its history, though, is anything but quiet, for it was here in 1859 that fiery abolitionist John Brown launched his ill-fated raid … Read more

Travel Guide: World War II Memorial by the Numbers

The World War II Memorial was dedicated in 2004 on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall, honoring the 16 million people who served as part of the U.S. Armed Forces during World War II, including more than 400,000 who died. It’s a spell-binding structure, with a splashing fountain surrounded by concrete pillars and pavilions. And it’s filled … Read more

Spring Civil War Wildflower Hikes

Long after the battles raged, Civil War battlefields have taken on a peaceful mode, providing serene places to stroll among preserved landscapes. Any time of year, the woodlands, meadows, rivers, and streams are beautiful places to walk, but springtime is especially special as wildflowers put on a colorful show, moving from one dazzling species to … Read more

Pennsylvania’s Other Civil War Sites

While we’re featuring Gettysburg this month in our “Tour Talk,” one of the Civil War’s most famous battles, there are plenty of other sites in Pennsylvania that aren’t as well known—but all have fascinating stories to tell. So if you’re heading out to Gettysburg, don’t forget to visit some of the state’s “other” sites as … Read more

Travel Guide: Peninsula Campaign

General McClellan’s major Union offensive against Richmond in the spring and summer of 1862 unfolded on the peninsula located between the James and York Rivers. The first stage ended inconclusively at the Battle of Seven Pines, where Confederate Gen. Joseph Johnston was injured. With Robert E. Lee taking his place, the Army of the Potomac … Read more

Civil War Bucket List for 2021

With an anticipated return to travel in 2021, it’s the perfect time to start planning a trip—or trips—to the Civil War’s most epic sites. Maybe you’ve seen them, maybe not, but these are the sights that always dazzle. And there’s always more to see and learn. One amazing way to visit a battlefield is with … Read more

Where to Find Civil War Ghosts

Halloween is nigh, and with it, the perfect time to talk about ghosts. Are they real? Who knows. What we do know is that, if they are, the Civil War and the gruesome deaths that it doled out provide plenty of fodder. Lots of places are said to be haunted. Here are some of the … Read more

Travel Guide: Shenandoah Valley During the Civil War

Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, running north-south between the Blue Ridge to the east, the Alleghenies to the west, hosted a four-year onslaught of clashes as Union and Confederate soldiers struggled to gain control over the strategic region. Indeed, it was a major transportation route with access to Richmond in the south and Washington, D.C., in the … Read more

Travel Guide: Enjoy Civil War Experiences from Home

Maybe we can’t go visit Civil War sites right now, but there’s an excellent Plan B: Experiences from home. A slew of virtual tours, online galleries, and interactive experiences helps us to explore some of the war’s most famous, and lesser known, sites. And even when things get back to normal, these will still be … Read more