FIVE QUESTIONS for Len Riedel: Civil War New Orleans and the Gulf Coast

As Dixie’s largest city, New Orleans buzzed during the Civil War with commercial, shipping, and manufacturing verve. The Union coveted it for all of the above, resulting in the Farragut-led Battle of New Orleans and subsequent Union occupation. In his upcoming tour on April 5-8, 2019, “Civil War New Orleans and the Gulf Coast,” BGES’ … Read more

New Project Intel: Conspirator’s Courtroom at Fort McNair

It may look like any other mid-19th-century courtroom, but this third-floor room in Fort Lesley J. McNair’s Grant Hall, in Washington, D.C., is like no other. For it was here, between May and July 1865, that eight co-conspirators in Abraham Lincoln’s assassination–including a woman–were tried and convicted, and four were sentenced to death by hanging. … Read more

Civil War on Foot: Williamsburg

Williamsburg flaunts its colonial heritage, and rightly so–it served as the capital of the Virginia Colony between 1699 and 1780. But after the state government moved to Richmond in 1780, the old colonial capital fell into decay. Civil War came to its doorsteps in 1862, as part of the Peninsula Campaign, in which General George … Read more

Time Travel: In John Brown’s Footsteps

Fanatical abolitionist. Rebel. Martyr. Lunatic. Criminal. People view John Brown in different ways, but one thing is sure: His place was written into history at the dawn of the Civil War, during his brazen attack on the US armory at Harper’s Ferry. Here are some of the places that tell the life story of this … Read more